Publications

Topics:
  1. S. Doveh, E. Schwartz, C. Xue, R. Feris, A. M. Bronstein, R. Giryes, L. Karlinsky, MetAdapt: Meta-learned task-adaptive architecture for few-shot classification, Pattern Recognition Letters details

    MetAdapt: Meta-learned task-adaptive architecture for few-shot classification

    S. Doveh, E. Schwartz, C. Xue, R. Feris, A. M. Bronstein, R. Giryes, L. Karlinsky
    Pattern Recognition Letters

    Few-Shot Learning (FSL) is a topic of rapidly growing interest. Typically, in FSL a model is trained on a dataset consisting of many small tasks (meta-tasks) and learns to adapt to novel tasks that it will encounter during test time. This is also referred to as meta-learning. Another topic closely related to meta-learning with a lot of interest in the community is Neural Architecture Search (NAS), automatically finding optimal architecture instead of engineering it manually. In this work we combine these two aspects of meta-learning. So far, meta-learning FSL methods have focused on optimizing parameters of pre-defined network architectures, in order to make them easily adaptable to novel tasks. Moreover, it was observed that, in general, larger architectures perform better than smaller ones up to a certain saturation point (where they start to degrade due to over-fitting). However, little attention has been given to explicitly optimizing the architectures for FSL, nor to an adaptation of the architecture at test time to particular novel tasks. In this work, we propose to employ tools inspired by the Differentiable Neural Architecture Search (D-NAS) literature in order to optimize the architecture for FSL without over-fitting. Additionally, to make the architecture task adaptive, we propose the concept of ‘MetAdapt Controller’ modules. These modules are added to the model and are meta-trained to predict the optimal network connections for a given novel task. Using the proposed approach we observe state-of-the-art resu

    T. Weiss, N. Peretz, S. Vedula, A. Feuer, A. M. Bronstein, Joint optimization of system design and reconstruction in MIMO radar imaging, Proc. IEEE Int'l Workshop on Machine Learning for Signal Processing details

    Joint optimization of system design and reconstruction in MIMO radar imaging

    T. Weiss, N. Peretz, S. Vedula, A. Feuer, A. M. Bronstein
    Proc. IEEE Int'l Workshop on Machine Learning for Signal Processing

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar is one of the leading depth sensing modalities. However, the usage of multiple receive channels lead to relative high costs and prevent the penetration of MIMOs in many areas such as the automotive industry. Over the last years, few studies concentrated on designing reduced measurement schemes and image reconstruction schemes for MIMO radars, however these problems have been so far addressed separately. On the other hand, recent works in optical computational imaging have demonstrated growing success of simultaneous learningbased design of the acquisition and reconstruction schemes, manifesting significant improvement in the reconstruction quality. Inspired by these successes, in this work, we propose to learn MIMO acquisition parameters in the form of receive (Rx) antenna elements locations jointly with an image neuralnetwork based reconstruction. To this end, we propose an algorithm for training the combined acquisition-reconstruction pipeline end-to-end in a differentiable way. We demonstrate the significance of using our learned acquisition parameters with and without the neural-network reconstruction.

    Y. Nahshan, B. Chmiel, C. Baskin, E. Zheltonozhskii, R. Banner, A. M. Bronstein, A. Mendelson, Loss aware post-training quantization, Machine Learning details

    Loss aware post-training quantization

    Y. Nahshan, B. Chmiel, C. Baskin, E. Zheltonozhskii, R. Banner, A. M. Bronstein, A. Mendelson
    Machine Learning

    Neural network quantization enables the deployment of large models on resource-constrained devices. Current post-training quantization methods fall short in terms of accuracy for INT4 (or lower) but provide reasonable accuracy for INT8 (or above). In this work, we study the effect of quantization on the structure of the loss landscape. We show that the structure is flat and separable for mild quantization, enabling straightforward post-training quantization methods to achieve good results. We show that with more aggressive quantization, the loss landscape becomes highly non-separable with steep curvature, making the selection of quantization parameters more challenging. Armed with this understanding, we design a method that quantizes the layer parameters jointly, enabling significant accuracy improvement over current post-training quantization methods.

    C. Baskin, B. Chmiel, E. Zheltonozhskii, R. Banner, A. M. Bronstein, A. Mendelson, CAT: Compression-aware training for bandwidth reduction, JMLR, 2021 details

    CAT: Compression-aware training for bandwidth reduction

    C. Baskin, B. Chmiel, E. Zheltonozhskii, R. Banner, A. M. Bronstein, A. Mendelson
    JMLR, 2021

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have become the dominant neural network architecture for solving visual processing tasks. One of the major obstacles hindering the ubiquitous use of CNNs for inference is their relatively high memory bandwidth requirements, which can be a main energy consumer and throughput bottleneck in hardware accelerators. Accordingly, an efficient feature map compression method can result in substantial performance gains. Inspired by quantization-aware training approaches, we propose a compression-aware training (CAT) method that involves training the model in a way that allows better compression of feature maps during inference. Our method trains the model to achieve low-entropy feature maps, which enables efficient compression at inference time using classical transform coding methods. CAT significantly improves the state-of-the-art results reported for quantization. For example, on ResNet-34 we achieve 73.1% accuracy (0.2% degradation from the baseline) with an average representation of only 1.79 bits per value.

    E. Amrani, A. M. Bronstein, Self-supervised classification network, arXiv:2103.10994, 2021 details

    Self-supervised classification network

    E. Amrani, A. M. Bronstein
    arXiv:2103.10994, 2021

    We present Self-Classifier — a novel self-supervised end-to-end classification neural network. Self-Classifier learns labels and representations simultaneously in a single-stage end-to-end manner by optimizing for same-class prediction of two augmented views of the same sample. To guarantee non-degenerate solutions (i.e., solutions where all labels are assigned to the same class), a uniform prior is asserted on the labels. We show mathematically that unlike the regular cross-entropy loss, our approach avoids such solutions. Self-Classifier is simple to implement and is scalable to practically unlimited amounts of data. Unlike other unsupervised classification approaches, it does not require any form of pre-training or the use of expectation maximization algorithms, pseudo-labelling or external clustering. Unlike other contrastive learning representation learning approaches, it does not require a memory bank or a second network. Despite its relative simplicity, our approach achieves comparable results to state-of-the-art performance with ImageNet, CIFAR10 and CIFAR100 for its two objectives: unsupervised classification and unsupervised representation learning. Furthermore, it is the first unsupervised end-to-end classification network to perform well on the large-scale ImageNet dataset. Code will be made available.

    E. Rozenberg, D. Freedman, A. M. Bronstein, Learning to localize objects using limited annotation with applications to thoracic diseases, IEEE Access Vol. 9 details

    Learning to localize objects using limited annotation with applications to thoracic diseases

    E. Rozenberg, D. Freedman, A. M. Bronstein
    IEEE Access Vol. 9

    Motivation: The localization of objects in images is a longstanding objective within the field of image processing. Most current techniques are based on machine learning approaches, which typically require careful annotation of training samples in the form of expensive bounding box labels. The need for such large-scale annotation has only been exacerbated by the widespread adoption of deep learning techniques within the image processing community: deep learning is notoriously data-hungry. Method: In this work, we attack this problem directly by providing a new method for learning to localize objects with limited annotation: most training images can simply be annotated with their whole image labels (and no bounding box), with only a small fraction marked with bounding boxes. The training is driven by a novel loss function, which is a continuous relaxation of a well-defined discrete formulation of weakly supervised learning. Care is taken to ensure that the loss is numerically well-posed. Additionally, we propose a neural network architecture which accounts for both patch dependence, through the use of Conditional Random Field layers, and shift-invariance, through the inclusion of anti-aliasing filters. Results: We demonstrate our method on the task of localizing thoracic diseases in chest X-ray images, achieving state-of-the-art performance on the ChestX-ray14 dataset. We further show that with a modicum of additional effort our technique can be extended from object localization to object detection, attaining high quality results on the Kaggle RSNA Pneumonia Detection Challenge. Conclusion: The technique presented in this paper has the potential to enable high accuracy localization in regimes in which annotated data is either scarce or expensive to acquire. Future work will focus on applying the ideas presented in this paper to the realm of semantic segmentation.

    T. Weiss, O. Senouf, S. Vedula, O. Michailovich, M. Zibulevsky, A. M. Bronstein, PILOT: Physics-Informed Learned Optimal Trajectories for accelerated MRI, Journal of Machine Learning for Biomedical Imaging (MELBA), 2021 details

    PILOT: Physics-Informed Learned Optimal Trajectories for accelerated MRI

    T. Weiss, O. Senouf, S. Vedula, O. Michailovich, M. Zibulevsky, A. M. Bronstein
    Journal of Machine Learning for Biomedical Imaging (MELBA), 2021

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has long been considered to be among “the gold standards” of diagnostic medical imaging. The long acquisition times, however, render MRI prone to motion artifacts, let alone their adverse contribution to the relatively high costs of MRI examination. Over the last few decades, multiple studies have focused on the development of both physical and post-processing methods for accelerated acquisition of MRI scans. These two approaches, however, have so far been addressed separately. On the other hand, recent works in optical computational imaging have demonstrated growing success of the concurrent learning-based design of data acquisition and image reconstruction schemes. Such schemes have already demonstrated substantial effectiveness, leading to considerably shorter acquisition times and improved quality of image reconstruction. Inspired by this initial success, in this work, we propose a novel approach to the learning of optimal schemes for conjoint acquisition and reconstruction of MRI scans, with the optimization, carried out simultaneously with respect to the time-efficiency of data acquisition and the quality of resulting reconstructions. To be of practical value, the schemes are encoded in the form of general k-space trajectories, whose associated magnetic gradients are constrained to obey a set of predefined hardware requirements (as defined in terms of, e.g., peak currents and maximum slew rates of magnetic gradients). With this proviso in mind, we propose a novel algorithm for the end-to-end training of a combined acquisition-reconstruction pipeline using a deep neural network with differentiable forward- and backpropagation operators. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed solution in application to both image reconstruction and image segmentation, reporting substantial improvements in terms of acceleration factors as well as the quality of these end tasks.

    A. Arbelle, S. Doveh, A. Alfassy, J. Shtok, G. Lev, E. Schwartz, H. Kuehne, H. Barak Levi, P. Sattigeri, R. Panda, C.-F. Chen, A. M. Bronstein, K. Saenko, S. Ullman, R. Giryes, R. Feris, L. Karlinsky, Detector-free weakly supervised grounding by separation, Proc. CVPR, 2022 details

    Detector-free weakly supervised grounding by separation

    A. Arbelle, S. Doveh, A. Alfassy, J. Shtok, G. Lev, E. Schwartz, H. Kuehne, H. Barak Levi, P. Sattigeri, R. Panda, C.-F. Chen, A. M. Bronstein, K. Saenko, S. Ullman, R. Giryes, R. Feris, L. Karlinsky
    Proc. CVPR, 2022

    Nowadays, there is an abundance of data involving images and surrounding free-form text weakly corresponding to those images. Weakly Supervised phrase-Grounding (WSG) deals with the task of using this data to learn to localize (or to ground) arbitrary text phrases in images without any additional annotations. However, most recent SotA methods for WSG assume the existence of a pre-trained object detector, relying on it to produce the ROIs for localization. In this work, we focus on the task of Detector-Free WSG (DF-WSG) to solve WSG without relying on a pre-trained detector. We directly learn everything from the images and associated free-form text pairs, thus potentially gaining an advantage on the categories unsupported by the detector. The key idea behind our proposed Grounding by Separation (GbS) method is synthesizing `text to image-regions’ associations by random alpha-blending of arbitrary image pairs and using the corresponding texts of the pair as conditions to recover the alpha map from the blended image via a segmentation network. At test time, this allows using the query phrase as a condition for a non-blended query image, thus interpreting the test image as a composition of a region corresponding to the phrase and the complement region. Using this approach we demonstrate a significant accuracy improvement, of up to 8.5% over previous DF-WSG SotA, for a range of benchmarks including Flickr30K, Visual Genome, and ReferIt, as well as a significant complementary improvement (above 7%) over the detector-based approaches for WSG.

    Y. Elul, A. Rosenberg, A. Schuster, A. M. Bronstein, Y. Yaniv, Meeting the unmet needs of clinicians from AI systems showcased for cardiology with deep-learning-based ECG analysis, PNAS, 2021 details

    Meeting the unmet needs of clinicians from AI systems showcased for cardiology with deep-learning-based ECG analysis

    Y. Elul, A. Rosenberg, A. Schuster, A. M. Bronstein, Y. Yaniv
    PNAS, 2021

    Despite their great promise, artificial intelligence (AI) systems have yet to become ubiquitous in the daily practice of medicine largely due to several crucial unmet needs of healthcare practitioners. These include lack of explanations in clinically meaningful terms, handling the presence of unknown medical conditions, and transparency regarding the system’s limitations, both in terms of statistical performance as well as recognizing situations for which the system’s predictions are irrelevant. We articulate these unmet clinical needs as machine-learning (ML) problems and systematically address them with cutting-edge ML techniques. We focus on electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis as an example domain in which AI has great potential and tackle two challenging tasks: the detection of a heterogeneous mix of known and unknown arrhythmias from ECG and the identification of underlying cardio-pathology from segments annotated as normal sinus rhythm recorded in patients with an intermittent arrhythmia. We validate our methods by simulating a screening for arrhythmias in a large-scale population while adhering to statistical significance requirements. Specifically, our system 1) visualizes the relative importance of each part of an ECG segment for the final model decision; 2) upholds specified statistical constraints on its out-of-sample performance and provides uncertainty estimation for its predictions; 3) handles inputs containing unknown rhythm types; and 4) handles data from unseen patients while also flagging cases in which the model’s outputs are not usable for a specific patient. This work represents a significant step toward overcoming the limitations currently impeding the integration of AI into clinical practice in cardiology and medicine in general.

    L. Karlinsky, J. Shtok, A. Alfassy, M. Lichtenstein, S. Harary, E. Schwartz, S. Doveh, P. Sattigeri, R. Feris, A. M. Bronstein, R. Giryes, StarNet: towards weakly supervised few-shot detection and explainable few-shot classification, Proc. AAAI, 2021 details

    StarNet: towards weakly supervised few-shot detection and explainable few-shot classification

    L. Karlinsky, J. Shtok, A. Alfassy, M. Lichtenstein, S. Harary, E. Schwartz, S. Doveh, P. Sattigeri, R. Feris, A. M. Bronstein, R. Giryes
    Proc. AAAI, 2021

    In this paper, we propose a new few-shot learning method called StarNet, which is an end-to-end trainable non-parametric star-model few-shot classifier. While being meta-trained using only image-level class labels, StarNet learns not only to predict the class labels for each query image of a few-shot task, but also to localize (via a heatmap) what it believes to be the key image regions supporting its prediction, thus effectively detecting the instances of the novel categories. The localization is enabled by the StarNet’s ability to find large, arbitrarily shaped, semantically matching regions between all pairs of support and query images of a few-shot task. We evaluate StarNet on multiple few-shot classification benchmarks attaining significant state-of-the-art improvement on the CUB and ImageNetLOC-FS, and smaller improvements on other benchmarks. At the same time, in many cases, StarNet provides plausible explanations for its class label predictions, by highlighting the correctly paired novel category instances on the query and on its best matching support (for the predicted class). In addition, we test the proposed approach on the previously unexplored and challenging task of Weakly Supervised Few-Shot Object Detection (WS-FSOD), obtaining significant improvements over the baselines.

    E. Amrani, R. Ben-Ari, D. Rotman, A. M. Bronstein, Noise estimation using density estimation for self-supervised multimodal learning, Proc. AAAI, 2021 details

    Noise estimation using density estimation for self-supervised multimodal learning

    E. Amrani, R. Ben-Ari, D. Rotman, A. M. Bronstein
    Proc. AAAI, 2021

    One of the key factors of enabling machine learning models to comprehend and solve real-world tasks is to leverage multimodal data. Unfortunately, the annotation of multimodal data is challenging and expensive. Recently, self-supervised multimodal methods that combine vision and language were proposed to learn multimodal representations without annotation. However, these methods choose to ignore the presence of high levels of noise and thus yield sub-optimal results. In this work, we show that the problem of noise estimation for multimodal data can be reduced to a multimodal density estimation task. Using multimodal density estimation, we propose a noise estimation building block for multimodal representation learning that is based strictly on the inherent correlation between different modalities. We demonstrate how our noise estimation can be broadly integrated and achieves comparable results to state-of-the-art performance on five different benchmark datasets for two challenging multimodal tasks: Video Question Answering and Text-To-Video Retrieval.

    O. Dahary, M. Jacoby, A. M. Bronstein, Digital Gimbal: End-to-end deep image stabilization with learnable exposure times, Proc. CVPR, 2021 details

    Digital Gimbal: End-to-end deep image stabilization with learnable exposure times

    O. Dahary, M. Jacoby, A. M. Bronstein
    Proc. CVPR, 2021

    Mechanical image stabilization using actuated gimbals enables capturing long-exposure shots without suffering from blur due to camera motion. These devices, however, are often physically cumbersome and expensive, limiting their widespread use. In this work, we propose to digitally emulate a mechanically stabilized system from the input of a fast unstabilized camera. To exploit the trade-off between motion blur at long exposures and low SNR at short exposures, we train a CNN that estimates a sharp high-SNR image by aggregating a burst of noisy short-exposure frames, related by unknown motion. We further suggest learning the burst’s exposure times in an end-to-end manner, thus balancing the noise and blur across the frames. We demonstrate this method’s advantage over the traditional approach of deblurring a single image or denoising a fixed-exposure burst.

    A. Boyarski, S. Vedula, A. M. Bronstein, Spectral geometric matrix completion, Proc. Mathematical and Scientific Machine Learning, 2021 details

    Spectral geometric matrix completion

    A. Boyarski, S. Vedula, A. M. Bronstein
    Proc. Mathematical and Scientific Machine Learning, 2021

    Deep Matrix Factorization (DMF) is an emerging approach to the problem of reconstructing a matrix from a subset of its entries. Recent works have established that gradient descent applied to a DMF model induces an implicit regularization on the rank of the recovered matrix. Despite these promising theoretical results, empirical evaluation of vanilla DMF on real benchmarks exhibits poor reconstructions which we attribute to the extremely low number of samples available. We propose an explicit spectral regularization scheme that is able to make DMF models competitive on real benchmarks, while still maintaining the implicit regularization induced by gradient descent, thus enjoying the best of both worlds.

    E. Rozenberg, A. Karnieli, O. Yesharim, S. Trajtenberg-Mills, D. Freedman, A. M. Bronstein, A. Arie, Inverse design of quantum holograms in three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals, CLEO, 2021 details

    Inverse design of quantum holograms in three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals

    E. Rozenberg, A. Karnieli, O. Yesharim, S. Trajtenberg-Mills, D. Freedman, A. M. Bronstein, A. Arie
    CLEO, 2021

    We introduce a systematic approach for designing 3D nonlinear photonic crystals and pump beams for generating desired quantum correlations between structured photon-pairs. Our model is fully differentiable, allowing accurate and efficient learning and discovery of novel designs.

    A. Karbachevsky, C. Baskin, E. Zheltonozshkii, Y. Yermolin, F. Gabbay, A. M. Bronstein, A. Mendelson, Early-stage neural network hardware performance analysis, Sustainability 13(2):717, 2021 details

    Early-stage neural network hardware performance analysis

    A. Karbachevsky, C. Baskin, E. Zheltonozshkii, Y. Yermolin, F. Gabbay, A. M. Bronstein, A. Mendelson
    Sustainability 13(2):717, 2021
    The demand for running NNs in embedded environments has increased significantly in recent years due to the significant success of convolutional neural network (CNN) approaches in various tasks, including image recognition and generation. The task of achieving high accuracy on resource-restricted devices, however, is still considered to be challenging, which is mainly due to the vast number of design parameters that need to be balanced. While the quantization of CNN parameters leads to a reduction of power and area, it can also generate unexpected changes in the balance between communication and computation. This change is hard to evaluate, and the lack of balance may lead to lower utilization of either memory bandwidth or computational resources, thereby reducing performance. This paper introduces a hardware performance analysis framework for identifying bottlenecks in the early stages of CNN hardware design. We demonstrate how the proposed method can help in evaluating different architecture alternatives of resource-restricted CNN accelerators (e.g., part of real-time embedded systems) early in design stages and, thus, prevent making design mistakes.
    Keywords: neural networks; accelerators; quantization; CNN architecture